Government Grants You Can Apply For (If You’re Eligible)

Many U.S. citizens are eligible for government grants

Each year, the federal government awards grants to thousands of citizens. These grants are free money. Recipients don’t have to pay back the balance nor are they required to pay for eligibility. Simply put, when an American has a specific need for additional money and the government supports the purpose, they will sometimes provide funds. Do you want to do something but need a few extra bucks to make it happen? You may be eligible.

If you have a goal and want to know whether or not you can get federal (or state/local) funding, try using the internet to find one that suits you. Until then, here is a list of 9 popular grant categories and grants for which you may be eligible.

 

(1) For education:

– Health Professions Pre-graduate Scholarship Program for Indians
– Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need Byrd Honors Scholarships
– Early Doctoral Student Research Grants
– Stafford Loans for Students
– Migrant Education – High School Equivalency Program
– Area Health Education Centers
– National Health Service Corps Scholarship Program
– Morris K. Udall Scholarship Program
– TRIO – Upward Bound
– Educational Exchange – University Lecturers
– Harry S Truman Scholarship Program
– Health Professions Preparatory Scholarship Program for Indians
– Scholarships for Health Professions Students from Disadvantaged Backgrounds
– Education and Human Resources Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship Program
– Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs

(2) For homeowners:

– VA – Home Loan – Construction
– VA – Home Loans – Interest Rate Reduction Refinancing Loan
– Government Grants for First Time Home Buyers
– VA – Home Loans – Native American Direct Loan (NADL) Program
– VA – Home Loans – Regular Purchase
– Basic FHA Loan (Home Mortgage Insurance – HUD/FHA)
– Mortgage Insurance: Purchase of a Cooperative Housing Unit

 

 

(3) For farmers and rural inhabitants:

– Rural Business Enterprise Grants
– Rural Housing: Farm Labor Housing Loans and Grants
– Rural Housing: Housing Repair Loans and Grants
– Quentin N. Burdick Programs for Rural Interdisciplinary Training
– Emergency Farm Loans
– Food and Agricultural Sciences National Needs Graduate Fellowship Grants

(4) For research:

– Alcohol National Research Service Awards for Research Training
– Contraception and Infertility Research Loan Repayment Program
– Criminal Justice Research and Development – Graduate Research Fellowships
– Fisheries Development and Utilization Research and Development
– Mental Health National Research Service Awards for Research Training

(5) For minorities:

– Indian Loans Economic Development
– Morris K. Udall Native American Congressional Internship Program
– Indian Community Development Block Grant Program
– Management and Technical Assistance for Minority Business Enterprises
– Indian Tribes and Tribal Corporation Loans

(6) For businesses:

– Small Business Investment Companies
– Native American Business Development Centers
– Business Physical Disaster Loans
– Support Mechanisms for Disadvantaged Businesses
– Employment and Training Assistance

(7) For emergencies:

– Home and Property Disaster Loans
– Dislocated and Laid-Off Worker Assistance
– Military Reservist Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program
– Economic Injury Disaster Loans

(8) For neighborhoods:

– Community Facilities Loans and Grants
– Grants for Public Works and Economic Development Facilities
– Community Development Block Grants/Entitlement Grants

(9) And for many, many other purposes:

– Bonding Assistance Program
– Promotion of the Humanities – Fellowships and Stipends
– Commodity Marketing Assistance Loans and Loan Deficiency Payments
– Grants and Cooperative Agreements Program
– Human Resource Programs
– Javits Fellowships
– VA – Life Insurance – Veterans Life Insurance Policy Loans
– Government Grants for Single MothersBasic/Core
– National Fire Academy Training Assistance
– Promotion of the Humanities – Seminars and Institutes

 

 

Great, how do I get some?

Well, first, you have to have a legitimate purpose. If you’re trying to complete scientific research, buy a home, buy a car, start a business, rent a home in spite of your low-income, go to college, increase the energy efficiency of your house, pay for medical bills or a score of other activities, you’ll probably be able to find something fits your needs. A little research should turn up grants relevant to your situation. The internet is a great place to find such things. There is even a federal website designed to simplify your federal grant search.

After you find one (or a few) grants that serve your purpose, you’ll need to apply. Grant writing can be a tricky affair and, depending on how competitive a particular grant is, you may need to create something quite compelling to get funds. Again, the internet is a great resource. You can find free advice, guides and samples, all of which are designed to help you write an effective grant letter.

Pick the right grant

It’s important to apply only to grants for which you are qualified. You’ll never slip through the cracks and get free money by accident. Plus, even if you were awarded a grant designed for, say purchasing energy efficient windows, the funds probably have stipulations stating that they can’t be used for anything else.

When you don’t use grant money or do use it for unintended purposes, you may be expected to repay it. Grants are not for upgrading the sound system in your new car or buying pairs of hot, new sneakers, so only pick grants that will help you do things that you actually want to do.

When will I get the money?

Processing and evaluating the grant applications may take some time. You’ll usually find that each has a specific deadline and a period afterwards for the deciding body to review all of the pitches. Once a grant is awarded, it could take days or weeks to pay out. Grant applications are not a get-rich-quick scheme.

One of the reasons that grant selections take so much time is that grant money has to be sent to qualified recipients. It can be politically hazardous to just send money to controversial people or program, so officials make sure that they pick carefully.